IRIS pallida ‘Variegata’

Iris, Variegated

0824 (=’Variegata’) Also known as the Zebra Iris, this is a very old garden plant, still as popular as ever. It forms a low clump of sword-like leaves, with golden-yellow and grey-green stripes running lengthwise, remaining nearly evergreen in mild winter regions. Fragrant lavender-blue flowers appear in early summer. Excellent for cutting. Plants must have excellent drainage, particularly in hot, humid summer regions or areas with wet winters. Clumps may be easily divided every 3 to 4 years in late summer, exactly as you would treat a Bearded Iris. CAUTION: Harmful if eaten.

Winchester Gardens generally stocks this item. 

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Iris
Variegata
Perennial
3
Spring, Summer
Light Blue
Deep Green, Gold, Variegated
No
Yes
Yes

Yes
Yes

21-23″
12-18″

Planting Instructions

  • Irises need at least half a day of sun and well-drained soil. Without enough sun, they won’t bloom.
  • They prefer fertile, neutral to slightly acidic soil. If your soil is very acidic, sweeten it with a bit of lime, and forbear summer watering, which can lead to rot.
  • Bearded irises must not be shaded by other plants; many do best in a special bed on their own.
  • Soil drainage is very important. Loosen the soil with a tiller or garden fork to a depth of 12 to 15 inches, then mix in a 2- to 4-inch layer of compost.
  • Plant iris in mid- to late summer.
  • Bearded irises have rhizomes (fleshy roots) that should be partially exposed, or thinly covered with soil in hot climates.
  • Plant rhizomes singly or in groups of three with the fans outermost, 1 to 2 feet apart, depending on the size.
  • Dig a shallow hole 10 inches in diameter and 4 inches deep. Make a ridge of soil down the middle and place the rhizome on the ridge, spreading roots down both sides. Fill the hole with soil and firm it gently.
  • Water thoroughly.
  • When planting, top-dress with a low-nitrogen fertilizer, and again in early spring.

Care

  • Avoid applying high-nitrogen fertilizers to the surface or carelessly mulching with organic matter, which may encourage rhizome rot.
  • Keep rhizomes exposed. Unlike bulbs, which thrive deep underground, iris rhizomes need a bit of sun and air to dry them out. If they’re covered with soil or crowded by other plants, they’ll rot. Irises may benefit from shallow mulching in the spring.
  • Don’t trim iris leaves. Leaves carry on photosynthesis for next year’s growth. Cut off brown tips—and cut the flowering stalk down to the rhizome to discourage rot.
  • If iris foliage is hit with heavy frost, remove and destroy it to eliminate borer eggs.
  • After 2 to 5 years, when clumps become congested or lose vitality, divide and replant sound rhizomes in fresh soil. The best time to replant irises is soon after bloom. Transplant them to places where they will have “wet feet but dry knees.”

Companion Plants
Thrift – Thrift’s tight mounds of grayish foliage and spherical pink or white flower heads are perfect companions for some of the low-growing species of iris in rock gardens.
Primrose – Many primroses thrive in wet areas where water-loving iris also thrives. Earlier-blooming primroses extend the season of bloom, which is continued by the iris.
Peony – The sumptuous flowers and handsome fingered foliage of peonies show off well against bearded iris flowers and sword-shape leaves.
Lupine – In areas where lupines do well, the vertical spikes of flowers make a stunning picture with bearded iris. Their palmate leaves contrast well with those of iris.

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